24 Aug

Hyperallergic: Artists Quarantine with their Collections

Above: Enrique Figueredo and Elizabeth McGrady, “Tipping Point” (2020), screenprint and monoprint on Stonehenge pale blue paper, 14 x 11 inches; below: Kristen Morgin, “Bitter Cups” (2015), glazed ceramic, each: 2.5 x 3 inches in diameter

…A recent acquisition that now sits on the mantle behind those cups is a print of George Floyd projected on the Robert E. Lee monument here in Richmond, the former “Heart of the Confederacy.” The print, produced by Enrique Figueredo and Elizabeth McGrady, was a fundraiser with 100% of the proceeds benefitting undocumented families impacted by the pandemic; the Minneapolis Sanctuary Hotel; and the Marsha P. Johnson Institute… Full article here.

14 Aug

Exquisite Corpse Fundraiser

Conduit Gallery presents Exquisite Corpse, a collaborative group exhibition fundraiser with an online preview, August 12th, 2020 and a physical exhibition in the gallery available to view in person by appointment August 15th through August 22nd, 2020.

Thirty-three Conduit Gallery artists participated in the drawing game Exquisite Corpse by taking turns drawing sections of a body on a sheet of paper, folded to hide each individual contribution. Artists were grouped into three participants per drawing and collaborated to complete one drawing each for a total of 41 artworks that will be exhibited on the gallery website and in the gallery, as well as sold as a fundraiser, with 100 percent of sales divided equally between Dallas based artist support fund, E.A.S.L and the Black Voters Matter Fund.

05 Mar

OPENING: BODY | OBJECT | IMAGE

  • JENNIFER LING DATCHUK, TERI FRAME, MARGARET MEEHAN, JULIE MALEN, CLAIRE SHERWOOD, XIA ZHANGFriday, March 6, 2020
  • 5:00 PM  9:00 PM
  • Candela Books + Gallery214 West Broad Street, Richmond, VA
12 Jan

Margaret Meehan: Sculpture Magazine

December 9, 2019 by Kay Whitney

Conduit Gallery-Dallas, Texas

We like to imagine that the arc of history follows some kind of trajectory, like a book or a movie. Artists like Margaret Meehan, however, recognize that there is no clear chain of events, that history is illogical, directionless, and unpredictable. “Hope is the Thing with Feathers,” her recent exhibition, interrogated the iterations of contemporary feminist protest by examining it as an unstable cycle that moves forward and regresses over time. Meehan’s works mine contradictions, emphasizing the precarious nature of cultures and social structures. Full review here.